27 July 2011

Dark Energy Camera imager of the Dark Energy Survey completed

This month, Fermilab technicians and Dark Energy Survey collaborators installed the last of 62 science-quality charged coupling devices, or CCD’s, into the imager for the Dark Energy Camera [called DECam] currently housed at SiDet. CCDs work like film, and each one contains 8 million pixels. The camera also has another 12 CCDs of 4 million pixels each for guiding and focusing. The imager will head to Chile in mid-August for installation on the Blanco telescope. DES collaborators in Chile just finished installing the off-telescope components of the DECam imager liquid-nitrogen cooling system in preparation for the camera’s arrival. Photo: Reidar Hahn

Dark Energy Survey, DES, is trying to determine what is expanding the universe and how dark energy is connected to it by imaging distancing galaxies.

[via: DES at Facebook]

28 May 2011

Photopic Sky Survey

The Photopic Sky Survey is a 5,000 megapixel photograph of the entire night sky stitched together from 37,440 exposures. Large in size and scope, it portrays a world far beyond the one beneath our feet and reveals our familiar Milky Way with unfamiliar clarity.

Nick Risinger has made a brilliant job of unprecedented scale, capturing the depths of our home galaxy from our perspective on Earth. We usually see images of stars and nebulas only from their “portraits”, but now it is possible to locate them in a vast landscape which is encircling us, and which defines the location of our existence.

PS. Photopic means daylight vision.

1 April 2011

NASA presents an improved infrared image of the Milky Way core, from previous data gathered by the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2008. The original image is stitched from 800’000 images Spitzer took during five years. Printed, the image spans 120 by 3 feet, 6 feet at the core buldge. Even at this resolution, the image contains only about 50% of our galaxy.

You can view the complete zoomable image here: http://mipsgal.ipac.caltech.edu/iracmips_map.html

[via: spitzer.caltech.edu, nasa.gov]

20 June 2010

How to completely destroy the earth

[via:Hacker News]

23 April 2010

The Known Universe # takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe”.

[via:Chris Helenius]

9 January 2009

Milky Way Transit Authority Map by Samuel Arbesman

Milky Way Transit Authority Map

[via:Nelg]

13 September 2008

‘Water bears’/Tardigrades are first animal to survive space vacuum

“Water bears, also known as tardigrades, are known for their virtual indestructibility on Earth. The creatures can survive intense pressures, huge doses of radiation, and years of being dried out.”

[via:URSA]

25 July 2008

NASA opens up huge photo and video archive for public use

The site is a collaboration between NASA and the Internet Archive. The collection is not copyrighted and can be used freely.

[via:Metafilter]

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