12 January 2011

Illustration from 'I Modi' ('The Ways') by Pietro Aretino and Giulio Romano, a 16th century work of erotic fiction which according to some helped popularize print and literature

The Fascinating Story of Porn and Technology Adoption

Yes, Cracked.com publishes some fascinating stuff but I generally find it awkward to link to them.

Let’s take a moment to think about Cracked. Most everyone gets that their material and the research behind it doesn’t quite match the quality you find in Wired.

This meta comment on Cracked relates very closely to this story on the new web publishing industry I discussed little over a year ago. How every pun in a Cracked.com article actually is search engine optimization becomes laughably clear in this porn piece. The writer has slipped in just about every FCC safe adult entertainment related expression you could daydream up of in the story.

Improving content distribution with sex and porn is just that powerful. If you have a web site, you could try this yourself: just mention porn in some really obscure way and you’ll probably get at least some traffic through someone’s really fap happy search engine queries. If you mention child porn, you’ll be awarded search traffic so depraved you might feel a bit uncomfortable just storing your search referer data.

[via:Joonas Mäkinen]

16 July 2010

Secret of AA: After 75 Years, We Don’t Know How It Works

[via:Give Me Something To Read]

5 May 2010

Antarctic Research Bases Are Seriously Self-Sustaining

[via:Laughing Squid]

18 March 2010

“Payment ensuring system” remote exploit set off car horns in Texas

What’s amazing is that the car dealership bugged their customers cars to begin with.

[via:Thomas Nyman]

17 March 2010

Wired founder John Battelle on the hideous content lock-in of the iPad

“But the real reason media companies love the iPad is the same reason I don’t: It’s an old school, locked in distribution channel that doesn’t want to play by the new rules of search+social.”

#

I’m no expert on the iPad and its intended content format. But content like, say, the kind you’d get through an attempt at developing the glossy magazine concept, is worthless unless everything in it has urls and is googleable. Bear in mind that I’m the kind of person who’s having issues with the fact that newspapers and mags don’t put some kind of unique alphanumeric id on all articles inside the regular paper issue.

Something like Spotify’s url system for linking to artists, albums, song, playlists etc. represents a bare minimum of sharing features for content distributed through a proprietary distribution platform. In the case of Spotify, users still have to turn to third party services to gain basic web access to metadata. Being someone who gets most of his magazine reading done via url recommendations over the web and IRC, I’d have very little use for a modern magazine kind of medium if its content isn’t accessible via urls somehow.

But I have to say that trying to build a distribution platform resembling Spotify, Steam or iTunes for magazines/text/photo/video clip content just for the sake of control is a terrible idea. If done right, such a platform could be based on websites with paywalls (optimized for different screens) and provide cute custom applications for e.g. better local offline storage of content.

[via:Kari Haakana]

6 March 2010

Wired: Cyberwar Hype Intended to Destroy the Open Internet

[via:Joonas Mäkinen]

20 January 2010

Obama Supports $675K File Sharing Verdict

Chaaaaaange.

[via:Scott Beale]

22 December 2009

How Duke Nukem forever failed

[via:Waxy]

18 December 2009

Content farming: conquering the web by producing cheap content based on search stats

“Most media companies are trying hard to increase those numbers, to boost the value of their online content until it matches the amount of money it costs to produce. But […] instead of trying to raise the market value of online content to match the cost of producing it — perhaps an impossible proposition — the secret is to cut costs until they match the market value.”

You might have noticed how Sturgeon’s Law (“Ninety percent of everything is crud”) lives its own rampant life on the Internet in the form of these ad filled sites with unbelievably shitty how-tos and fake advice. But wait a year or two until clustered ponds of shit like eHow, Cracked and Livestrong might begin to mimic journalism. Quality media has only started its long, stinky journey down the rabit hole/drain pipe of the Intertube

Also:
An interview with Demand Media CEO Richard Rosenblatt

[via:Olli Sulopuisto]

23 September 2009

Russian Soviet Era Doomsday Machine still operational

[via:Charris]

21 September 2009

“Brain Activity” in Dead Salmon warns fMRI Researchers about false positives

[via:Slashdot]

15 August 2009

“When Zombies Attack!: Mathematical Modelling of an Outbreak of Zombie Infection,” by Philip Munz, Ioan Hudea, Joe Imad and Robert J, Smith.

In “Infectious Disease Modelling Research Progress,” eds. J.M. Tchuenche and C. Chiyaka, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. pp. 133-150, 2009.

Wired provides a summary.

[via:Slashdot]

1 July 2009

Zeropaid’s index of bittorrent sites

[via:Threat Level]

6 March 2009

Most of the time, most of us need almost nothing: Wired on the success of netbooks

The Eee PC 901‘s battery life stunned me, but the shitty keyboard made me buy a Macbook as soon as I could – I probably should have bought an Aspire One in the first place. The current generation Atom CPUs are too slow to run modern, Javascript and Flash heavy web sites smoothly, but I agree with the article, we’re getting closer to what most people actually need for their personal computing.

[via:net.nyt]

5 December 2008

Wired magazine founder predicting the machine and entity of the future Web

Kevin Kelly, founding editor of Wired speculating about the Hivemind International that’s just around the corner. Video recording from EG 2007.

[via:High Scalability]

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